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    NEW YORK'S HOMETOWN NEWSPAPER® — Learn About Subscriptions
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    Anthony Warner was RV bomber, killed in Christmas Day blast in Nashville, federal officials say

    A man believed to have acted alone in the explosion of a bomb inside an RV in Nashville early Christmas morning was killed in the blast, federal authorities said Sunday.

    The man was identified as Anthony Quinn Warner after officials connected him to the incident through evidence that included a DNA match.

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    “We’re still following leads, but right now there is no indication that any other persons were involved,” FBI special agent Douglas Korneski said. “We’ve reviewed hours of security video surrounding the recreation vehicle. We saw no other people involved.”

    Federal and state officials say Anthony Quinn Warner of Antioch was the Christmas morning bomber and died in the explosion.
    Federal and state officials say Anthony Quinn Warner of Antioch was the Christmas morning bomber and died in the explosion.

    Nashville Metro Police Chief John Drake on Friday said officials had “found tissue that we believe could be remains” at the scene of the explosion.

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    Officials continue to search for a motive for the blast, which left three people with non-life threatening injuries.

    Warner, 63, had a history of working in the technology field, including as a computer consultant for a realtor in the Tennessee city where the explosion took place, according to public records.

    Surveillance footage shows the recreational vehicle suspected of being used in the Christmas day bombing which was playing "Downtown" by Petula Clark before the blast.
    Surveillance footage shows the recreational vehicle suspected of being used in the Christmas day bombing which was playing "Downtown" by Petula Clark before the blast. (Handout/Metro Nashville Police)

    Federal officials searched Warner’s home on Saturday, according to the Tennessean. A Google Street View image from 2019 reportedly shows an RV parked at the property.

    The FBI is investigating whether Warner was paranoid about 5G technology being employed in an effort to spy on people, according to Nashville news station WSMV.

    A recorded message warning people to evacuate the area was heard coming from the RV before the explosion. The audio then changed to the 1964 song “Downtown” by Petula Clark playing from the vehicle shortly before the 6:29 a.m. blast, said multiple officers who were at the scene evacuating people.

    “What I remembered was ‘downtown, where the lights shine bright,’ ” recalled Tyler Luellen of Metro Nashville Police, referencing song lyrics, according to Nashville news station WKRN.

    Officer Amanda Toppings on Sunday also said she recalled hearing “Downtown” play before the explosion, then “felt the waves of heat but I kind of just lost it and started sprinting toward” another officer,” she said. “I’ve never grabbed someone so hard in my life.”

    “This is going to tie us together forever, for the rest of my life,” added Officer James Wells. “Christmas will never be the same.”

    Numerous buildings in the area were damaged, and phone service and 911 systems also experienced issues after the explosion, which occurred near an AT&T building.

    Nashville Police Officer Amanda Topping speaks at a news conference Sunday, Dec. 27, in Nashville, Tenn. Topping is one of six officers credited with evacuating people before an explosion took place in downtown Nashville early Christmas morning.
    Nashville Police Officer Amanda Topping speaks at a news conference Sunday, Dec. 27, in Nashville, Tenn. Topping is one of six officers credited with evacuating people before an explosion took place in downtown Nashville early Christmas morning. (Mark Humphrey / AP)

    Luellen was one of five responding officers who to spoke reporters Sunday about what transpired at the scene of the explosion.

    Nashville Chief of Police John Drake speaks at a news conference Sunday, Dec. 27, in Nashville, Tenn.
    Nashville Chief of Police John Drake speaks at a news conference Sunday, Dec. 27, in Nashville, Tenn. (Mark Humphrey/AP)

    On Sunday, the driver of a box truck playing “audio similar” to what came from the RV days earlier was detained in Tennessee, according to the Rutherford County Sheriff’s Office.

    Investigators at the site of an explosion in downtown Nashville, Tenn.
    Investigators at the site of an explosion in downtown Nashville, Tenn. (Mark Humphrey/AP)

    “Sheriff’s deputies in Rutherford and Wilson Counties are investigating a box truck parked at a store playing audio similar to the Christmas explosion in Nashville,” tweeted the sheriff’s office, which said residents were evacuated.

    With News Wire Services

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